Google Doodle celebrates electronic music composer and German physicist Oskar Sala – The Hindu

Google Doodle celebrates electronic music composer and German physicist Oskar Sala

Google honors the ‘one-man orchestra’ Oskar Sala on their 112th birth anniversary.

Oskar Sala electrified the world of television, radio, and film with his musical pieces. Photo: Google Doodle

Google is celebrating the 112th birthday of the innovative electronic music composer and German physicist Oskar Sala on July 18 with a special Google Doodle, showcasing his composing music and developing new instruments.

Largely recognized for producing sound effects on a musical instrument called a mixture-trautonium, Sala electrified the world of television, radio, and film with musical pieces such as  Rosemary (1959) and The Birds (1962), Google wrote in a blog post.

Who was Oskar Sala?

Born in 1910 in Germany to parents who had a natural talent in music, Sala began creating compositions and songs for instruments like the violin and piano in his adolescent years.

“When Sala first heard about a device called the trautonium, he became fascinated by the tonal possibilities and the instrument’s technology. His life mission became mastering the trautonium and developing it further which inspired his studies in physics and composition at school,” Google said in the post.

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“This new focus led Sala to develop his own instrument called the mixture-trautonium. With his education as a composer and an electro-engineer, he created electronic music that set his style apart from others. The mixture-trautonium’s architecture is so unique that it was capable of playing several sounds or voices simultaneously.”

Sala also built the Quartett-Trautonium, Concert Trautonium, and the Volkstrautonium. His efforts in electronic music opened the field of subharmonics. “With his dedication and creative energy, he became a one-man orchestra,” the post adds.

Sala received several awards for his work — he gave many interviews, met numerous artists, and was honored in radio broadcasts and movies. In 1995, he donated his original mixture-trautonium to the German Museum for Contemporary Technology.

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About Aakash Ghosh 473 Articles
Akash Ghosh is a cricket enthusiast and a writer who covers the latest news and match previews for Panasiabiz. He has been following the game since he was a kid and enjoys analyzing the performances of players and teams. He also likes to share his opinions and predictions with fellow cricket fans through his articles and social media posts. Akash has a degree in journalism and a passion for writing engaging and informative content. Akash can be reached at [email protected]

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