A fourth COVID wave in Vietnam, probably the biggest!

Vietnam

Vietnam has been under the fourth COVID wave since last month, and this the biggest of all the waves the country has faced. According to reports from May 21, 2021, the country has faced 131 new reported cases. This surely makes a total of 1892 cases since April 2021. Out of this, 1600 cases have been recorded in not more than a few weeks. Amongst these cases, the Bag Giang Province has the most recorded number, which is 99 on a single day (May 21, 2021).

Details from the received reports:

Reports say that the variant named B16172, a sub-lineage of B1617, has been extensively found in several samples from the community. This variant was first identified in India. Vu Duc Dam, the Deputy Prime Minister of Vietnam, has requested the respected authorities to look into the matter that the supplies do not face any disruption in between, especially for the country’s northern province. The PM wants to ensure that the business epicenters in the North do not leave the country because a huge economic fall will be experienced in case that happens. So, the disease precautions need to be made in every possible way to stop the wave in the part of the country that is already more prone to such infection. Safety, hygiene, and other necessary steps need to be followed to resume business.

The very first real wave in Vietnam?

According to the epidemiologist Michael Toole of the Burnet Institute of Melbourne, the fourth wave is the very first real wave in the country. He added that the waves faced before were nothing compared to the present one since all the waves had 4600 cases which is even lower than a tenth of the cases reported in Singapore.

The reports of vaccination have not been very impressive. The country has been reported to be really slow with the vaccination scheme. Instead of a million doses, the country has recorded only 28852 doses of vaccination by May 18, 2021. The country already has enough doses from AstraZeneca and is now negotiating with Pfizer, but these doses need to be brought to use and should be in use at a larger scale than at present.

About the Author

Camelia is an intern for PanAsiaBiz studying at the Amity University, Kolkata [B. Tech (biotechnology)]. She is fond of writing on Science, Health, and Biotechnology topics.

1 Comment on this article. Feel free to join this conversation.

Leave A Response